Last edited by Kigaramar
Friday, May 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of Productivity growth in Latin America found in the catalog.

Productivity growth in Latin America

Bruton, Henry J.

Productivity growth in Latin America

by Bruton, Henry J.

  • 126 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Center for Development Economics, Williams College in Williamstown, Mass .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Henry J. Bruton.
SeriesResearch memorandum / Center for Development Economics, Williams College ; no. 10
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMLCM 81/0573
The Physical Object
Pagination25 leaves ; 28 cm.
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3830837M
LC Control Number81143507

Most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean are struggling to escape what economists label "the middle income trap." While much if not all of the region has emerged from low income status, neither growth nor productivity has increased sufficiently to enable Latin America to narrow the gap separating it from the world's most developed economies. Get this from a library! Productivity Growth in Latin American and the Caribbean: Exploring the Macro-Micro Linkages. [Jorge Thompson Araujo; Ekaterina Vostroknutova; Konstantin Wacker; World Bank eLibrary - York University.] -- This paper brings together the main findings and policy implications of two recent World Bank regional reports on economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  Boosting Productivity and Inclusive Growth in Latin America Over the past two decades, most Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries have experienced robust economic growth and been able to make significant reductions in poverty and income inequality.   This chapter summarizes the main results of the book, presenting new evidence on the factors preventing faster productivity growth in Latin America and the Caribbean. Innovation significantly Cited by: 2.

(T/F) Sustainable long-run economic growth is long-run growth that can continue in the face of decreases in the growth rate of the world's population. False (T/F) According to estimates of the aggregate production function, each 1% increase in physical capital, holding human capital and technology constant, raises labor productivity by %. Our results show that since structural change has been growth reducing – with labor moving from low – to high- productivity sectors – in both Africa and Latin America, with the most striking changes taking place in Latin America.


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Productivity growth in Latin America by Bruton, Henry J. Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Jobs of Tomorrow: Technology, Productivity, and Prosperity in Latin America and the Caribbean. c b. Tweet that policies intended to protect jobs from technology advancement would themselves stultify progress and depress productivity.

This book squarely addresses both sets of concerns with new research showing that adoption of digital Author: Mark Andrew Dutz, Rita Kullberg Almeida, Truman G. Packard. The Age of Productivity: Transforming Economies from the Bottom Up would be a fascinating read for anyone interested in the international political economy of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Productivity growth in Latin America book The book highlights and explains the various factors that can affect growth, productivity, and development.

productivity and to improve the standard of living of people in both regions. The book explores why Latin America and the Caribbean lag behind other parts of the world in terms of growth, economic development, and productivity.

Despite covering both regions, the discussion primarily references Latin February Lisa N. Huynh. @   In his magisterial new book, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, the Northwestern University professor lays out the case that the productivity.

Latin American Economic Outlook Youth, SkillS and EntrEprEnEurShip YOUTH progress skills education growth innovation middle class challenge technol gy opportunities inclusi n entrepreneurship democracy social networks jobs cities productivity future start ups. Latin American Economic Outlook Policy options to restore inclusive.

FOSTERING INCLUSIVE PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH IN LATIN AMERICA – 1 Introduction After a period of relatively robust growth that has allowed tens of millions of poorer households to join the global middle class, growth in Latin America has slowed recently, partly as a result of external factors.

Latin America’s productivity problem looks even worse compared with Asia. In the period, for instance, the IADB finds that growth in TFP accounted for only 58% of overall per-head income. Productivity growth in Latin American and the Caribbean: exploring the macro-micro linkages (English) Abstract.

This paper brings together the main findings and policy implications of two recent World Bank regional reports on economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean: Araujo, Vostroknutova, Wacker and Clavijo, eds.

() and Araujo, Vostroknutova, Brueckner Author: Jorge A. De Thompson R. Araujo, Ekaterina Vostroknutova, Konstantin M. Wacker. After relatively high growth in the first years of the 21st century with reduced poverty, rising incomes, and a growing middle class,[1] most countries in Latin America are now confronting a.

More specifically,in Latin America a 10 per cent increase in R&D spending on average results in a % increase in the probability of a firm innovating, and in a % increase in innovative er, innovation has a significant effect on productivity performance in the LAC region, where the labor productivity of firms that are innovative.

This volume uses the study of firm dynamics to investigate the factors preventing faster productivity growth in Latin America and the Caribbean, pushing past the limits of traditional macroeconomic analyses. Each chapter is dedicated to an examination of a different factor affecting firm productivity - innovation, ICT usage, on-the-job-training, firm age, access to credit, and international.

Demonstrates how an approach based on sources of economic growth (KLEMS – capital, labor, energy, materials and services) can be used to analyze economic growth and productivity; Includes examples covering the G7, E7, EU, Latin America, Norway, China.

CANCÚN, Mexico – Low productivity growth is the main reason most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have lagged growth rates of both advanced countries and peer countries in East Asia, according to a study by the Inter-American Development Bank ().

The study, which analyzed how efficiently nations are utilizing their productive resources, looked into productivity gains and losses. The Jobs of Tomorrow: Technology, Productivity, and Prosperity in Latin America and the Caribbean While adoption of new technologies is understood to enhance long-term growth and average per-capita incomes, its impact on lower-skilled workers is more complex and merits clarification.

that policies intended to protect jobs from. Low aggregate productivity growth in Latin America is an economy-wide phenomenon concerning all sectors; however, the findings highlight the possible importance of raising productivity in manufacturing and wholesale to have significant increases in aggregate productivity growth by: This volume uses the study of firm dynamics to investigate the factors preventing faster productivity growth in Latin America and the Caribbean, pushing past the limits of traditional macroeconomic analyses.

Each chapter is dedicated to an examination of a different factor affecting firm. Productivity growth and development in Latin America (English) Abstract. An examination of the derivation of the production function leads to a comparison of productivity trends in industrialized countries and in four Latin American countries.

Production function refers to output as a function of increased inputs of capital. Measuring Economic Growth and Productivity: Foundations, KLEMS Production Models, and Extensions presents new insights into the causes, mechanisms and results of growth in national and regional accounts.

It demonstrates the versatility and usefulness of the KLEMS databases, which generate internationally comparable industry-level data on outputs, inputs and productiv ity.

May On average, economic reforms in Latin America and the Caribbean have been associated with a percent yearly increase in the growth rate of total factor productivity. But there are important differences across countries, and in some cases economic reforms have been associated with lower growth in total factor productivity.

Firm Innovation and Productivity in Latin America and the Caribbean The Engine of Economic Development.

Editors This volume uses the study of firm dynamics to investigate the factors preventing faster productivity growth in Latin America and the Caribbean, pushing past the limits of traditional macroeconomic analyses.

This book is open. However, Latin America's economic growth became positive again in the s, with truly remarkable turnarounds in Argentina, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Peru.

This recovery was driven in most cases by large increases in the growth of total factor productivity, reflecting the initial benefits from the process of economic reforms Cited by:   Alicia Bárcena, executive secretary of the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean: “Labor productivity in Latin America relative to the United States has been falling since the s and has also trended lower since the end of the s relative to the current members of the European Union, when it was equivalent to Latin translation of the English word “productivity”.

The word productivity could not be translated into the selected target language by us. Translation may however be possible into the following other languages.